Tips to Optimize Your Warehouse Organization

Warehousing solutions are among the most important priorities for distributors and wholesale suppliers. From handling the movement of orders safely and efficiently all the way to grappling with an influx of new products, ensuring warehouse efficiency is one of the most important aspects that management should focus on.

Let’s look at a few simple tips that can help expand your warehouse, optimize your workflow efficiency, all while providing a safe experience for clients, colleagues, and customers alike.

Increase Warehouse Efficiency With These Organization Tips

According to a report put forth by the National Retail Federation in 2018, more than $46.8 billion in losses were reported due to shrinkage, a term used to describe lost earnings due to waste or theft. An inefficient warehouse that is not optimized or organized will contribute handily toward those loss totals.

So, how can a wholesale supplier or distributor ensure that their warehouse is organized, efficient, and maximized for effectiveness? Let’s look at three simple organizational tips that can help.

Take Stock of Your Warehouse Layout

There are many ways to organize a warehouse but there is only ONE version of your business. Making sure that your warehouse meets the specific needs of your company is of the utmost importance and that typically starts by assessing the floor plan of the building.

The ideal warehouse will offer a range of benefits through a flexible floor plan including:

  • Available Storage Flexibility
  • Plenty of Working Space
  • Minimize Foot Traffic To/From Stations
  • Creating Ease of Access for Stored Goods

Consider working with a team like KACO Warehouse Outfitters when it comes time to look over your floor plan.

Install New Warehouse Racks & Shelving

Whether your business is beholden to seasonal changes in supply and demand, or you simply need more space, adding new shelving racks and shelving storage solutions can solve plenty of problems.  When you work with a team like KACO to optimize your warehouse storage solutions, you’ll come across a range of potential products including the following:

  • Boltless Shelving
  • Widespan Bulk Shelving
  • Wire / Steel Shelving
  • Mezzanines, Pallet Racks, & Partitions

Just like any other aspect of life, the storage solutions you require today will change based on your industry. Don’t think that the same storage solutions for one business will correlate directly to yours. Request a quote from a shelving supplier in your area to see what direction you should go with your new warehouse racks and shelving units.

Optimize Your Picking / Packing Process

Items that end up in a warehouse will go through quite the adventure before they arrive at your front step. First arriving in the warehouse, these products are then sorted. Once sorted upon an assembly line, products are then distributed to the proper location where they’ll be repackaged and shipped out to consumers.

Between every step, a pair of actual human hands will be relied upon to keep the package moving. Time can be lost due to disorganized warehouses and a lack of proper planning.

Consider the following steps:

  • Minimize Travel Time Between Picking and Packing Locations
  • Popular Items Should Be Situated Closest to Packing
  • Update to Newer Item Picking Technology (RF Readers, Voice Picking)

Upgrade Your Warehouse at KACO Warehouse Outfitters!

KACO Warehouse Outfitters has been serving Phoenix and the surrounding areas for more than thirty years. Committed to high-quality customer service and positive employee growth, KACO Warehouse endeavors to make every client interaction a positive one. From upgraded storage products to tear-down and installation services, KACO does it all.

Reasons to Hire KACO Warehouse to Optimize Your Warehouse

  • 30+ Years of Quality Professional Experience
  • Owns and Operates Local Warehouse
    • Competitive Pricing
    • Convenient Material Access
    • Quick Turnarounds
  • All-in-One Warehousing Solutions

Head to KACO Warehouse Outfitters today to book your consultation!

image of redesigned warehouse

Rethinking You Warehouse Design? Consider This!

As a commercial or industrial warehouse owner, you are aware that your needs can change and vary based upon the challenges before you. Optimizing warehouse storage solutions are integral to running a tight ship in a fierce and competitive industry. To meet the challenges that are required of an industrial or commercial warehouse, we must optimize our warehouse for our experience.

When Should A Warehouse Get Redesigned

Warehouse operations are often long-term investments, so we must make sure that they are primed to meet our long-term goals. When it comes time to consider a warehouse redesign with Arizona’s leading warehouse outfitters, we must first ask and answer a few questions.

First, let’s take a look at a few common reasons for modifying the layout of a warehouse.

  • Inadequate Safety Practices — Warehouses are beholden to considerable safety practices and regulations. If a company is falling short in this area, a redesign may be necessary not just for efficiency, but also for the safety of everyone around.
  • Additional Storage Requirements — Some companies will vary their supply needs based on the ebb and flow of the season. Additional outside factors may suggest the need for additional storage, such as booming sales or a new marketing campaign.  Also, if your aisles and pallets are already filling up, you might need be space anyway.
  • New Product Introduction — Whenever a new product is brought to market, the storage needs must be ready to accommodate it. If you are introducing a new line or series of products, consider prepping now with a warehouse redesign.
  • Introduction of New Equipment — New operational equipment can dramatically change the workspace requirements of an entire warehouse. The introduction of pallet racks, conveyors, or even heavy lifting tools may demand a larger footprint.

Key Advantages to an Optimized Warehouse Design

It is easy to see how an optimized warehouse redesign can positively benefit our operations. With that being said, this can also become a costly procedure.

There are advantages both financially and professionally that can arrive with an optimized warehouse layout, so let’s take a closer look at how KACO Outfitters can help.

  • Optimize Workflow and Company Logistics
  • Boost Current and Future Storage Space
  • Safer and More Employee Friendly Workspace
  • Reduce Expenses Due to Inefficient Storage Practices

Maximizing a warehouse for success not just today but tomorrow is the goal at KACO Warehouse Outfitters. To tackle any of the problems or solutions posed above, let’s get on the phone with professionals who can help.

Call KACO Warehouse Outfitters For A+ Stocking and Storage Solutions

For the better part of 30 years, KACO Warehouse Outfitters has been supplying storage solutions to satisfied customers throughout the state of Arizona. With a focus on high-quality shelving and premium storage products, KACO Warehouse Outfitters is delighted to offer unbeatable prices and outstanding customer support to clients in need.

KACO Warehouse Outfitters stocks all supplies in its local warehouse to provide fast-acting customer service with in-house delivery, installation, and design operations. Schedule a free consultation today at KACO Outfitters!

image of someone using hand sanitizer

How the Coronavirus Changed Warehouse Management and Design

COVID-19 seemed to have come out of nowhere. In fact, when the COVID-19 pandemic began, warehouses were pressed to keep workers safe. They needed to stay open, but they needed to do it safely. In the beginning, no one knew how hard this pandemic would hit, but there was time to learn what worked and what didn’t work and warehouses are now better able to design a system that keeps inventory flowing and workers safe.

Warehouses across the country, including KACO Warehouse in Arizona, have had to rethink their business models to stop COVID-19 from spreading in the workplace. For example, warehouses have altered their design to accommodate social distancing. Without these measures, warehouses would not be able to stay open. Other ways warehouses are staying safe is by mask-wearing, temperature checks, and taking a fresh look at sick leave policies. This safety issue has been going on since March and since then, warehouses have implemented a number of safety precautions, one of which is rigorously cleaning tractors and forklifts, something that will likely continue once the pandemic is gone.

When it comes to redesigning warehouse space, it is all about how the workers navigate the warehouse and maintain six feet of social distancing while they’re working or on break and technology is helping. There are algorithms that know when employees are maintaining social distancing in warehouse aisles, along with cameras that are linked to a central hub. This technology is not there to spy on workers but to use algorithms to create safe routes for workers to follow when storing or accessing inventory. This technology goes so far to know when an employee is not working up to their capacity, which could be a sign they’re sick.

All of this came at a time when e-commerce began to skyrocket and that’s even before the holidays hit. With people in lockdown and not out shopping, we saw a huge spike in demand in 2020. In order to keep up with this demand, warehouses needed to implement safety measures and quickly. E-commerce sales before 2020 even ended jumped from 80 million to over 200 million. And the trend is not slowly down. Purchasing online is now the first option for many people locked down and needing supplies.

With no sign of the pandemic slowing down, the new safety measures implemented in warehouses across the country will remain for the unforeseeable future. There’s no reason to scrap them anytime soon. For most warehouses across the country, these new business models have worked. Consumers have no idea what has had to go on behind the scenes to make sure they received their delivery. Warehouses have had to make a lot of changes to stay in business, but it has certainly been worth it both for the companies and or consumers.

 

image of storage in warehouse

Dynamic vs. Static Storage

When planning the warehouse design of your facility, it’s important to take the time to determine the best layout. The warehouse design plays a critical role in operations. It can mean the difference between profit and loss. You want the design to be conducive to improving productivity and efficiency. You may even want to consider using a professional to assist you in the planning of your warehouse design. Distribution and warehouse center layouts include four elements: static storage, dynamic storage, receiving and shipping. Typically, these elements are laid out according to the space of the facility. Handling equipment and product are also considered in the layout of a warehouse.

The static storage space in a warehouse is where products are stored. And products are generally stored on pallets. The dynamic storage area is called the “forward pick.” That’s because this is the area where products are picked for fulfillment. Once items in the dynamic storage area are selected, they are quickly replenished.  Several factors of the dynamic storage area often include different types of racking to lessen overall pick time. It’s also called the pick module. The pick module is designed o the material handling equipment. For example, first-out pallet storage may be accessed by forklifts. Within this configuration, a selective rack may be included.

Also known as the reserve storage area, the static area is used to reserve palletized storage. For products that need higher selectivity, a drive-through rack may be a good option.

It’s important to take into consideration both static storage and dynamic storage when planning the layout of your warehouse. And the through-flow needs to also be considered. U-shaped warehouses are very common/ In this layout, receiving and shipping docks are right next to each other. I-shaped and L-shaped warehouse product flow layouts provide larger sorting and storage areas for both receiving and shipping docks.

Racking System Types for Dynamic and Static Storage Areas

The types of racking systems that you choose for the dynamic and static storage areas will be dependent on the needs for product flow. These systems come in two groups, “first-in, first-out” and “last-in, first-out.” The racking types that you use for both the dynamic and static storage areas of the warehouse or distribution center should be chosen for your product operations. Racking systems can be separated into two groups: “first-in, first-out (FIFO)” and “last-in, first-out (LIFO)”. The FIFO rack system works well when rapid stock rotation, high turnover rate and products with an expiration date are used. For example, food storage would require FIFO racking systems. Options of this racking system include pallet flow, drive-through, carton flow and selective. LIFO racking systems work well for an inventory that has a long shelf life. It also works well for items stored in large quantities. Options of this racking system include push back, double-deep selective and drive-in.

image of designed warehouse

The Reasons to Hire a Professional Warehouse Designer

Even though you may think you can design your own warehouse, there are many good reasons to use a professional warehouse designer instead. It’s unusual for anyone to who’s not a professional to have all the skills and knowledge to do this. Let’s take a look at the reasons why using a professional warehouse designer is a better option.

Maxing Efficiency

Efficiency is a critical factor in warehouse design. The better the efficiency of your warehouse design, the better the revenue. Designing a warehouse is not a one-size-fits-all task. No two facilities are the same. The layout of a warehouse design will affect efficiency. Everything from equipment to type of storage systems plays a role in warehouse design. A design professional can analyze the unique and specific needs of your warehouse to develop the best storage system for both vertical and horizontal space that is available in your warehouse. Plus, a warehouse designer professional will determine the best rack systems and equipment to use in your warehouse. The end result is that you get the best plan to maximize space for efficiency.

The Latest Technology

Professional warehouse designers use the latest technology to yield efficient handling, operational flexibility and maximum product storage. In addition, they can advise you of the latest software and technologies to optimize loading, reduce handling, ramp up communication, streamline picking processes and optimize shipping.

A Current Operational Assessment

There’s more to warehouse design than just planning for space. It entails a deep analysis of your current operations along with a plan for future growth. An experienced warehouse designer will consider the current growth rate of your facility and plan for expansion and overstock storage.

Sustainable Design Initiative

With a professional warehouse designer, you’ll get an environmentally sustainable design. This will help the environment and also save you money in the long run. Design professionals can help you select eco-friendly options to conserve water, reduce waste, minimize energy usage and optimize the facility for eco-friendliness.

The Right Permits

Professional warehouse designers have experience with all the permits that your facility will need. They also know how to get the job done quickly to avoid costly delays.

All around, a professional warehouse designer can make all the difference in developing a system to meet your operational challenges. With all the benefits of a professional warehouse designer, you can’t ignore the fact that it’s better to hire one than to try and do it yourself.

 

image of designed warehouse

Key Factors in Warehouse Design

When it comes to warehouse design, there are a few key factors to think about. You’ve got to think about outbound logistics, what happens in the warehouse and outbound logistics. Whether your company has one warehouse or multiple warehouses, the choice of location will influence costs, efficiency and service. If fast service is a part of your service, you’ll want to have the warehouse located close facilities of your carriers or close to where your customers are located. In addition to lead time and supply chain velocity, you’ll also need to think about the processes in the warehouse, storage, receiving and dispatch volumes. The goal is to focus on network optimization. How quick are your inventory returns? What’s the strategy for the best customer service. Also, there are physical requirements. Is your process manual or automated? And when it comes to inbound logistics, you’ve got to consider these questions. What are the lead times for incoming deliveries? Where are your supplier located? How reliable are your suppliers?

All About the FAST Concept

The FAST concept is the acronym for flow, accessibility, space and throughout. You can apply this concept to the layout of your warehouse design. The objective of FAST is to enable smooth workflows with an emphasis on warehouse location and service. It’s a tried and proven concept that you can use when designing a warehouse.

Once you know how many warehouses and their locations, then think about structural design and capacity. In order to focus on structural design and capacity, as yourself these questions.

  • What takes place in the warehouse? What are the daily operations? What areas do you need for intake, storage, packing, picking and dispatch? Where will you locate any value-added services?
  • What are the characteristics of the products? What types of products are stored? Are these products fragile or hazardous? Will you be using cartons or full pallets for storage? Are there rules and regulations for the storage of the products? Is any type of control needed in the environment, such as temperature control for frozen goods?
  • Does the season affect the storage? If volumes vary depending on the season, you’ll have to allow the proper capacity for this. Does your warehouse handle returns from customers? If it does, you’ll likely need extra space for this processing and storage.

Applying the FAST Concept to Warehouse Layout Design

Let’s begin with F for flow. Here, the concern is the uninterrupted flow of movement, including people, products and traffic. The goal here is to ensure there are no cross-flow clashes in the operations of the warehouse. There should be a logical sequence of operations inside the warehouse. A smooth flow of operations includes no disruption and a limited amount of movement. Time is money. With uninterrupted flow, you’ll be maximizing revenue.

Accessibility not only includes being able to get to the product, but to the packaging unit. Can the product be assessed via a truckload or a pallet load? How do the products in your facility get from one place to another? You’ll need to think about whether or not the strict policy of first-in-first-out (FIFO) applies to your product, since you’ve got to be certain that you’re in compliance.  In the case of bottled water, you may have to access inventory in a store stock room. For example, with pharmaceuticals, access may be needed to fast-moving stock area, and that takes space.

Let’s move on to space. Warehouse space should always be maximized for stock processing reasons and for operational storage. All space should be planned and utilized wisely. Keep in mind that you’ll need space for offices and working areas. Be sure to make optimal use of the cubic capacity of the space and not just the floor area. Build flexibility into the operation by using the best storage media that can evolve. This way, when your operations grow, you’re in place strategies can grow with it.

Throughout entails the nature of the product and its velocity. Characteristics like size, dimensions and shape have to be taken into consideration. The velocity of the product will depend on the volume of what’s moving in the warehouse. Use data media to assist in the layout of the design, and get the facts.  The better the data; the less the risk.

Without a doubt, there’s a lot to think about in warehouse design. It’s not an easy or simple task. Planning and designing is an important undertaking that requires a lot of thought. The main point is to understand that flow, accessibility, space and throughout must be in place for maximum efficiency. If you’re not certain on how to do this, consider consulting a specialist with plenty of experience in warehouse design. A specialist will be able to ensure that your warehouse design and operations work for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warehouse Safety Notice for Post-Covid Return

Post-Covid 19 in your Warehouse: Top Safety Priorities

The Covid-19 pandemic has changed a lot about our world, particularly in the way companies do their business. Many consumer are choosing to stay away from businesses to prevent exposure and more companies are allowing their employees to work from home. When it comes to working in warehouses, it’s no different. However, many of your employees will still need to physically do their jobs, which is why it’s important for companies that use warehouses to take the proper steps to ensure the safety and well-being of their employees. The following practices will help you give your warehouse employees peace of mind when they head into work each day.

Review Risk Assessments

While your previous risk assessments may have worked just fine, there’s a new normal so they need to be reassessed by today’s standards. First and foremost, you need to determine how to minimize or eliminate the risk of contracting the virus in your warehouse. This includes reducing the possible routes of transmission that may exist in your current processes. While PPE equipment can help, wherever possible, it’s better to provide Plexiglass partitions and the ability to socially distance wherever possible. Your employees’ input can be an invaluable part of this process. It’s also a good time to review and revamp cleaning processes, using the right cleaning agents, particularly on high-contact surfaces.

Check Supply Chain Safety

In the warehouse industry, it’s not just about your warehouse; it’s also about your supply chain. Talk to your vendors about their own precautions surrounding Covid-19 and make sure they’re taking the appropriate steps as well. Let them know what you’re doing to keep everyone safe and how that applies to their interactions with you. This will prevent more serious discussions down the line if something goes wrong.

Ensure Safety on All Shifts

Many warehouses have fire marshalls and employees trained in first aid to ensure the safety of all workers. When choosing who to furlough or allow to work from home, make sure you have these qualified individuals onsite during each shift. You may be able to reduce their numbers, but there should be someone present on all shifts so those who are still working at your physical location are protected.

Control Goods Going In and Out

Whether you deal with customer returns or it’s simply the delivery process, reducing points of contact is a must. While this isn’t fully possible for warehouses, limiting interactions and putting precautions in place will help keep everyone safer. Social distancing, proper cleaning and protective barriers are just part of this process. You may also have to isolate any goods coming in for 72 hours to ensure they’re free of the virus before going to the next point in the process. Remote drop-off from your supply chain can also be useful in reducing contact points.

Map Out a Response Plan

Even with all the proper precautions in place, someone in your warehouse could test positive at any point. Rather than being surprised and having to scramble to figure out what to do, haivng a response plan in place ahead of time can save a lot of time and money. Remember, one of the best ways to prevent the spread of Covid-19 is contact tracing. Having an effective way to map out where each employee is throughout the day can help make this process easier.

4 Ways To Be More Efficient In Your Warehouse

It’s important for warehouse owners and managers to keep an eye out for their efficiency levels. From knowing how to increase productivity to decreasing energy consumption, achieving higher efficiency can limit waste and boost revenue at the same time. To increase efficiency in a warehouse, you will likely need to invest in new equipment and machinery. This type of investment can make the warehouse more efficient in more ways than one. Keep reading to learn four ways your investment in increasing efficiency throughout the warehouse can have a huge payoff.

Track Power Consumption

You need equipment that tracks your energy consumption. With the data you collect, you can pinpoint which tasks require the most energy and time. You can even identify which days of the week your warehouse consumes the most energy. With this knowledge, it becomes easier to see where and how to reduce energy consumption. Take for example the data reveals the heating and cooling system accounts for the largest percentage of the warehouse’s overall consumption of energy. This knowledge indicates a need for upgrades throughout the warehouse’s HVAC system.

Increase Your Recycling Activities

There are likely several nearby recycling companies that you can partner with to increase your warehouse’s recycling activities. Some of these companies remove and recycle waste for you while others can even help you make a profit off of recycling. With the right equipment, though, you can easily recycle internally. This means you can take the warehouse’s waste, recycle it, and use it again. Take for example you want to recycle the warehouse’s garbage and use it as compost. This is completely doable with the right equipment, an excellent way to increase efficiency, and is also very friendly to Mother Nature.

Boost Productivity

Making a warehouse more efficient becomes quite simple when you figure out how to increase its overall productivity. Some of the best ways to increase productivity are to tinker with the systems you have to make operations more efficient, get rid of workplace distractions, and ensure you have managers in place who prioritize efficiency. It’s also highly suggested that you provide workers with a comfortable break area. This is another reason to invest in new equipment and machinery for the warehouse, even in the break areas. You want to make sure workers have access to drinks, food, and a place to sit and stretch.

Reduce Maintenance Fees

Lastly, improving efficiency is a great way to reduce maintenance fees, particularly when you use modern equipment. Today’s modern equipment uses advanced technology to deploy the latest green practices and reduce energy consumption. This results in fewer instances of necessary maintenance, which translates into reduced maintenance fees.

Final Thoughts

Increasing efficiency in your warehouse should be a top priority. In fact, it’s not a bad idea to have an operations manager solely devoted to this task. This ensures you have someone at all times working to make sure the warehouse is using the most up to date methods for decreasing energy consumption and increasing efficiency.

Reduce Packaging Costs and Plan For Every Part

Packaging is one of the most essential parts of manufacturing. An inefficient packing process not only wastes time, but it can also be a waste of valuable resources. When looking at the plan for every part, or PFEP, there are some simple ways you can optimize the supply chain and work toward using less packaging, which will reduce your manufacturing costs. When you implement PFEP into your manufacturing process, you will reduce your costs related to receiving, producing, storing and even shipping your parts and products.

Design and Develop a PFEP Template

It can be beneficial to appoint a team to work on creating a PFEP template that works best for your business in particular. These individuals will look at how to optimize the packaging within your plant, as well as how to optimize the packaging on the materials and other products that come from your suppliers. For many companies, it’s easier to start with implementing a plan for your internal processes first since you have more control over these processes. The good news is there is automated PFEP software available that can help streamline this process and guide your team in making the right decisions. This software clearly defines your inventory, keeps track of inventory usage and recommends supply chain adjustments. All of this is done automatically with little or no input from your team, freeing up their time to focus on other aspects and allowing for fast adjustments that start saving money faster.

Gather and Organize Data

It can be time-consuming to gather data on packaging processes, especially when you’re dealing with multiple systems. This is particularly difficult at the beginning of the process, which can lead to frustration and a lack of motivation. You can help motivate your team by celebrating the identification of accurate data sources and tracking the overall data input the team makes. One of the ways you can improve the effectiveness of this process is to utilize formulas designed to calculate pull signals and planned maximum inventory costs, levels and days. Your goal is to better understand your inventory, particularly the parts purchased. It’s unnecessary to plan or act on the data at this stage in the process.

Maintain and Optimize the Data

The third step in the process is to optimize your packaging. For instance, you can work with a supplier to optimize the packaging on your inbound shipments to reduce those packaging and inbound logistics costs, as well as improve the inventory space in your plant and keep inventory at an appropriate level. When you input this information in your automated PFEP software, it will identify standard packs, container weights and inbound logistics costs, calculating your future state PFEP. Minor adjustments can then be made to identify where you can save money. When you work with your suppliers on this matter, you not only improve your own bottom line, but you can also help them save money in the process. It’s a mutually beneficial task that can help both businesses reduce costs and improve profits. Many companies can save up to 20% of their costs using this process.

Actively refining your PFEP should be a continuous process. While it may seem overwhelming and difficult to implement in the first place, once the above steps are completed, you will be able to more easily make adjustments and ensure your business is operating with lower costs for a higher rate of return.

5 Ways To Use Plastic Pallet Boxes

Warehouses and shippers all over the world have switched over to plastic storage options. For the past decade, plastic pallet boxes in particular have reigned supreme as durable storage containers that hold a wide variety of items and be easily cleaned in between use. Many people also prefer these boxes over traditional storage because they are easily stackable and are fairly light despite being able to hold a large amount of weight. Unlike traditional wooden shipping crates, they can be secured without being nailed shut. Needless to say, plastic pallet boxes are also the more economical option because they can be used over and over again.

The proof is in the real-life ways they are used —plastic pallet boxes have been used for an impressive range of purposes over the years! Here are just five of the most unique ways they have been (and continue to be) used:

1. Helping Plastic Bottles Reach Their Purpose

Before plastic bottles take their shape and hold popular liquids, they are shipped to factories all over the world as simple “preforms.” Plastic pallet boxes make it possible to ship these bottle preforms in amazingly large quantities at a time, keeping them clean and sanitized in the process. Notably, the preforms for a popular sports drink were shipped in these containers at an impressive 20,000 units per box for the 2012 London Olympic games. These storage containers were chosen both for their stackable design and for their easy-to-clean surfaces.

2. As Supermarket Produce Displays

Grocery store customers should look closely at the produce section next time they’re shopping. Forgoing inconvenient, less-durable wood stands, many stores have started placing plastic pallet boxes directly on the store floor to use as produce displays. Which makes sense, because these are the containers that a lot of supermarket produce and products are shipped in these days anyway.

3. Assisting Professional Fisherman

For those who fish for a living, keeping equipment dry and secure is a serious matter. Some major fishing operations now use plastic pallet boxes as equipment storage both in port and on ship. These containers provide reliable protection from the elements and also

4. Keeping Animal Food Fresh

Both zoos and pet food suppliers use plastic pallets to store large quantities of animal feed and prevent it from getting moldy or stale. These seal-able containers also make it easier to transport these food products to different locations without having to worry about them losing freshness.

5. As Reusable Construction Materials

Plastic pallet boxes can be used over and over agin as shipping and storage containers, but some groups are using them for even more creative purposes. Plastic shipping containers have been recycled into everything from office spaces to outdoor decking. In 2014, a student group in Lebanon even used hundreds of these boxes to build a durable emergency shelter.

What’s Next for Plastic Pallet Boxes?

If the current track record is any indicator, the future is bright for plastic pallet storage. The question now is not so much what “can” be shipped via these storage containers, but rather what “can’t” be. They are already used widely around the world, so it’s only a matter of time before even more versatile uses become known.